“In very simple terms, I’m going to say ‘No.'”

A man who claims taking a prescription painkiller turned him gay was given a dose of reality by a doctor on TV.

Scott Purdy claimed he was attracted to women and had “quite a few” girlfriends before an accident forced him to take Lyrica.

That’s when his heterosexuality allegedly vanished and his interest in men developed. While a loss of libido is a possible side effects of Lyrica, the commercial name for Pregabalin, it’s the first time anyone has claimed that it’s changed their sexual orientation.

Purdy says he’s content to be gay, but insists it’s the medication that’s made him that way.

On Thursday, he appeared on the British TV show This Morning, where Dr. Ranj Singh, who is gay himself, suggested the pills just allowed him to “express what was already there.”

“Can a painkiller turn you gay?” host Phillip Schofield asked.

“In very simple terms, I’m going to say no,” Singh replied, telling Purdy, “First and foremost, I think it’s great that you’re happy. I think that’s the most important thing here.” He noted the medication’s ability to calm nerves, and suggested that it allowed him to be his “true self.”

“These feelings were probably always there, and sexuality is complex,” Singh added. “It’s not black and white. Different people experience it differently, and some people are fluid.”

Purdy, who experimented with another man once when he was younger, said when he went off Lyrica briefly his attraction to his now ex-girlfriend returned. But the pain was so great he went back to taking it, and his interest in her dwindled again. He now says he worries if he stops taking the drug, he’ll go back to being straight.

Singh told Purdy he shouldn’t stay on a controlled substance any longer than is medically necessary. “I’ve been on Pregabalin myself,” he added. “I’m sorry to say it didn’t make me any gayer.”

medicine

“These feelings were probably always there, and sexuality is complex,” Singh added. “It’s not black and white. Different people experience it differently, and some people are fluid.”

Purdy, who experimented with another man once when he was younger, said when he went off Lyrica briefly his attraction to his now ex-girlfriend returned. But the pain was so great he went back to taking it, and his interest in her dwindled again. He now says he worries if he stops taking the drug, he’ll go back to being straight.

Singh told Purdy he shouldn’t stay on a controlled substance any longer than is medically necessary. “I’ve been on Pregabalin myself,” he added. “I’m sorry to say it didn’t make me any gayer.”