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George Takei Came Out Because He Was Angry at Arnold Schwarzenegger

Iconic gay actor George Takei revealed that he came out publicly because he was livid with then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.The 85-year-old Star Trek star told the British theatre publication The Stage that he came out in 2005 because Schwarzenegger, who served as California’s Republican governor from 2003-2011, had vetoed legislation that would have allowed same-sex marriages in the state.At the time, he and his now-husband Brad Altman had been together for more than 18 years.Takei explained that he hadn’t come out sooner because he wanted to continue receiving roles, The Stage reports.“I learned at a young age that you couldn’t be an openly gay actor and hope to be employed,” Takei said. “And I was already an Asian-American actor, so I was already limited a lot.”Takei spoke candidly of regrets he had for holding onto the secret for so long.“I was silent during the AIDS crisis, which fills me with guilt, although I did write checks and checks to AIDS organizations,” the actor said.Schwarzenegger, he said, displayed a hypocrisy that Takei could not stomach.“Why did I come out when I did? Because Schwarzenegger presented himself as a movie star who had worked and was friends with gays and lesbians, many of whom voted for him, but then vetoed that bill,” he said.
advocate.com

All news where London is mentioned

metro.co.uk
Tammy Faye musical with music and lyrics by Sir Elton John and Scissor Sisters star Jake Shears heading to London stage
London, with music by Sir Elton John, less than a year after the Oscar-winning film about the televangelist was released.Tammy Faye A New Musical will premiere at the Almeida Theatre in October for a limited run until December 3.Musical legend Sir Elton, who has previously seen great success on stage through his composing for The Lion King and Billy Elliot the musical, is once more lending his talents to a new project.Clearly fitting it around his upcoming collaboration with Britney Spears, Sir Elton worked with Scissors Sisters star Jake Shears, on lyrics, and writer James Graham, who has penned the book.Playwright Graham’s last show for the Almeida, Ink in 2017, transferred to the West End and then on to Broadway, and covered his take on Rupert Murdoch’s purchasing of The Sun newspaper in 1969.It was nominated for – and won – multiple Olivier and Tony Awards, with Graham also the brains behind popular new BBC crime thriller Sherwood.Katie Brayben will be stepping into the shoes of Jessica Chastain as Tammy Faye Messner, the colourful televangelist whose empathy for those living with HIV and Aids in the 1980s made her a gay icon.Perhaps Messner’s defining moment was her television interview with Steve Pieters in 1985, an openly gay pastor living with HIV.Chastain won this year’s best actress Oscar for her performance as the PTL (Praise The Lord) Club founder, on her third nomination following back-to-back nominations in 2012 and 2013 for The Help and Zero Dark Thirty.Girls and Broadway star Andrew Rannells is taking on the role of her first husband Jim Bakker, played by Andrew Garfield in the 2021 movie, whose behaviour brought about the downfall of the couple’s Christian media empire – which also included popular theme
queerty.com
Police officers strip naked at gay club and their bosses aren’t happy
For once it’s the police officers who’ve been issued a stern warning, and an odd one at that: Stop going full monty at the gay club!!Apparently some Met police officers have been spending their off-duty hours baring it all at London club G-A-Y’s weekly stripping competition, and their bosses aren’t thrilled.Police officials have warned the officers to quit it with the public nudity, saying it would be “awkward” when they have to return to the venue on official duty.Officers at the Central West Basic Command Unit (BCU) were further warned that “CCTV would be viewed and officers spoken to” should they participate going forward, and now we can’t get the image of a bunch of irritated cops huddled around a video of amateur, gay strippers.“It makes it awkward for the staff at the location to then have to deal with you when you are next on shift attending the venue to carry out official duties,” West End police said in an email, according to The Times.Related: PHOTOS: Meet the cast of Netflix’s crimefighting male stripper showA police spokesperson noted that no laws have been violated, but that officers need to “uphold standards while off duty.”“An inspector from the West End Proactive Partnership Team has sent an email to staff within the Met’s Central West BCU after a matter was reported to the Met’s Licensing officers,” the spokesperson said, adding:“There is no suggestion of any unlawful act having taken place.“However, officers were reminded of the need to uphold standards while off duty, especially when identifying themselves as police officers.”The Met force has faced recent, widespread criticism after a police watchdog report found numerous incidents of misogyny, racism and homophobia among its officers.It’s not a huge
queerty.com
Police officers strip naked at gay club and their bosses aren’t happy
For once it’s the police officers who’ve been issued a stern warning, and an odd one at that: Stop going full monty at the gay club!!Apparently some Met police officers have been spending their off-duty hours baring it all at London club G-A-Y’s weekly stripping competition, and their bosses aren’t thrilled.Police officials have warned the officers to quit it with the public nudity, saying it would be “awkward” when they have to return to the venue on official duty.Officers at the Central West Basic Command Unit (BCU) were further warned that “CCTV would be viewed and officers spoken to” should they participate going forward, and now we can’t get the image of a bunch of irritated cops huddled around a video of amateur, gay strippers.“It makes it awkward for the staff at the location to then have to deal with you when you are next on shift attending the venue to carry out official duties,” West End police said in an email, according to The Times.Related: PHOTOS: Meet the cast of Netflix’s crimefighting male stripper showA police spokesperson noted that no laws have been violated, but that officers need to “uphold standards while off duty.”“An inspector from the West End Proactive Partnership Team has sent an email to staff within the Met’s Central West BCU after a matter was reported to the Met’s Licensing officers,” the spokesperson said, adding:“There is no suggestion of any unlawful act having taken place.“However, officers were reminded of the need to uphold standards while off duty, especially when identifying themselves as police officers.”The Met force has faced recent, widespread criticism after a police watchdog report found numerous incidents of misogyny, racism and homophobia among its officers.It’s not a huge
queerty.com
Ode to The Backstreet: London loses its last leather club
Lab.oratory (the underbelly of Berlin’s Berghain) must rank as the greatest sex space in the history of the universe, the 37-year patina which coats nearly every nook, cranny, and orifice of east London fetish stalwart The Backstreet surely singles out this den of iniquity as unique among the waning number of surviving male-only bars devoted to leather, rubber and the rest.Not even Berlin’s gay ‘ghetto’ Schöneberg has anything to rival it: an atmospherically lit, blackened, and cinematic space coded top to bottom in conventionally manly signifiers (black oil drums, thick festooned chains, dusty boots dangling from the ceiling, camouflage netting, two big cages, stools, dirty everything), playlists that consistently get it just right (sexy but never overly aggressive music), and an unbendingly strict door policy (albeit with waistcoats and boots made available to those guilelessly showing up in mufti). A reassuring brand of sleazy anonymity pervades the bar and one that lends itself to a wet and sticky dream. Sadly, this piece is not merely an unbridled celebration of Backstreet–an establishment that occupies a singular position in the pantheon of gay leather bars that includes both New York’s Mineshaft and Spike, Hamburg’s Toms Saloon, London’s Cellar Bar, Amsterdam’s Argos, Berlin’s Knaast, Paris’s Keller, Munich’s Ochsengarten, Antwerp’s The Boots and various Eagles, nearly all of which are dead or near-dying.
queerty.com
Ode to The Backstreet: London’s den of iniquity was last of a leather kind
Lab.oratory (the underbelly of Berlin’s Berghain) must rank as the greatest sex space in the history of the universe, the 37-year patina which coats nearly every nook, cranny, and orifice of east London fetish stalwart The Backstreet (aka Backstreet) surely singles out this den of iniquity as unique among the waning number of surviving male-only bars devoted to leather, rubber and the rest.Not even Berlin’s gay ‘ghetto’ Schöneberg has anything to rival it: an atmospherically lit, blackened and cinematic space coded top to bottom in conventionally manly signifiers (black oil drums, thick festooned chains, dusty boots dangling from the ceiling, camouflage netting, a big cage, stools, dirty everything), playlists that consistently get it just right (sexy but never overly aggressive music), and an unbendingly strict door policy (albeit with waistcoats and boots made available to those guilelessly showing up in mufti). A reassuring brand of sleazy anonymity pervades the bar and one that lends itself to a wet and sticky dream. Sadly, this piece is not merely an unbridled celebration of an establishment that occupies a singular position in the pantheon of gay leather bars that includes both New York’s Mineshaft and Spike, Hamburg’s Toms Saloon, London’s Cellar Bar, Amsterdam’s Argos, Berlin’s Knaast, Paris’s Keller, Munich’s Ochsengarten, Antwerp’s The Boots and various Eagles, nearly all of which are dead or near-dying.
metro.co.uk
Soho absolutely buzzing with Pride well into the early hours
London’s Soho was well and truly filled with people celebrating the 50th anniversary of Pride last night, as it returned to the capital for the first time in two years.The West End neighbourhood, an epicentre for the LGBTQ+ community, was decorated with an abundance of rainbow flags lighting up the streets with colour.Iconic venues in the area hosted their own after-parties while many revellers gathered in the streets to mingle.Couples shared kisses, friends drank and danced, and the police officers were seen smiling amid the fun, despite being banned from joining the parade.Earlier in the day, over a million people paraded through the capital to mark the big Pride milestone.The celebration, which had been halted due to the Covid pandemic, returned to the capital for what organisers called the ‘biggest and most inclusive event in history’.Crowds had been led by the Gay Liberation Front whose activists took part in the original 1972 parade, where 2,000 marched in protest of police treatment towards the LGBTQ+ community.This year saw some 600 groups and organisations join the parade from Hyde Park Corner to Whitehall.In Trafalgar Square, famous faces such as Dame Kelly Holmes and Peter Schofield – both of whom have come out in recent years – addressed the crowds, while an array of artists performed.Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at webnews@metro.co.uk.For more stories like this, check our news page.
metro.co.uk
Top tips for anyone going to their first ever London Pride this weekend
London Pride is officially back this weekend, and we can’t wait.After three years away amid the Covid pandemic, the annual LGBTQ+ celebration will return with a bang on Saturday.It all kicks off with a huge parade through the centre – accompanied by singing, comedy and poetry performances, drag brunches, film showings, and much more.More than 1.5 million LGBTQ+ travellers are expected to flock to the capital for the 50th anniversary of the first Pride march in the UKWhile some regulars will be gearing up to return, other people will be preparing to attend their first-ever Pride.With this in mind, Pride in London has released some essential tips for first-timers.Everyone is welcomeQueer or not, you shouldn’t be worried that you don’t fit in at Pride; put that thought out of your head right away, says Haven Thorn, spokesperson for Pride in London.He said: ‘Pride is for everyone, and is a chance for you to celebrate not just your gender and sexuality, but always as yourself – and you’re perfect! ‘With that said, Pride attracts people from all walks of life, including sexualities and gender, so it’s crucial to keep an open-mind and be respectful when meeting new people or seeing new things.‘Pride is a judgement free-zone, spanning five decades of queer history, and kindness, acceptance, and mutual respect are of the utmost importance.’Remember what it’s all aboutPride is a great day for everyone involved – but it’s about much more than just having fun.‘While an aspect of Pride is about having loads of fun and coming together as a community, Pride also has a rich history behind it, commemorating the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City and the first-ever protest here in the UK’, Haven says.He adds: ‘With a multitude of
metro.co.uk
Opening of UK’s first-ever LGBTQ+ museum is the ‘start of something beautiful’
London.The UK’s first Pride March, in 1972, took place just a few miles away between Hyde Park and Trafalgar Square.The march is depicted among the photographs within the Queer Britain museum, along with other key moments spanning the UK’s LGBTQ+ history.The museum’s contents are tightly interwoven with its staff.Front of House manager Stephanie Stevens initially joined Queer Britain as a volunteer, desperate to get ‘involved in any way’.She told Metro.co.uk: ‘As a trans woman, queer identifying, this was so important to me, I wanted to get involved in any way.‘Having an entire space dedicated to LGBTQ+ history is just amazing.‘It’s so normal to have to be grateful to be in the background of some other space, hidden away in a back room.‘To have our own museum is long overdue, it’s something we’ve needed for a long time.‘We’re slap-bang in the middle of London, standing shoulder to shoulder with huge institutions.’The aptly named ‘Welcome to Queer Britain’ display is the inagural exhibition for the museum.Lasting until July and spread over several rooms, it features key images from throughout the history of UK’s battle for LGBTQ+ rights.Rickshaw rider charged £180 for three minutes - and now he's got a £1,000 fineWhat I Rent: Oriana, £2,000 a month for a one-bedroom flat in Canning Town, LondonChef sacked for not washing hands after being caught 'kissing and fondling' waiterSection 28, the law which prohibited the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ by councils, introduced by the Thatcher Government in 1988, is featured.However images of more joyful occasions, such as the legalisation of equal marriage in England, Wales and Scotland – and later Northern Ireland – are also depicted.The exhibit also features key figures such as
metro.co.uk
Veterans from UK’s first Pride to mark 50th anniversary of ‘revolutionary’ event
London for the UK’s first-ever Pride march.The group marched from Trafalgar Square to Hyde park carrying placards, banners and chanting slogans.There was a heavy police presence and a not wholly welcoming reaction from the public but the march, organised by the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), was Britain’s first Pride and in the words of one attendee ‘signalled a real change in British society’.On July 1, 2022, veterans of the first Pride march will retrace the route of the original protest to mark the event’s 50th anniversary.Among them will be today’s guest editor Peter Tatchell, who was one of around 30 GLF members who helped organise the inaugural march.‘We came up with the idea of gay pride because mainstream straight society said we should be ashamed of who we were,’ Peter told Metro.co.uk.Homosexuality between men was partially decriminalised in 1967, but it did little to reduce discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community.‘Gay bashing and violence was rife, including murders,’ Peter added.‘Most LGBT+ people dared not come out and show their faces in public.‘They feared arrest, rejection by their friends and families and being sacked from their jobs.‘Organising the first gay Pride was a huge gamble, we had no idea if anybody would turn up.’Two weeks before the march Peter and other members of the GLF went to Earls Court to spread the word about the march.‘We received a mostly negative reaction from gay men at The Bolton and Coleherne pubs,’ he said.‘Bar staff and customers forced us out of the Coleherne and some gay customers threw bottles and coins at us.‘They said things like you “Shouldn’t draw attention to us”, “Don’t make a fuss.
metro.co.uk
First openly trans MP accuses government of ‘breaking promise’ to LGBT people
ban on conversion therapy.Jamie Wallis, Conservative MP for Bridgend, came out in defence of trans rights this week, accusing Boris Johnson of ‘breaking his promise’ to LGBT+ people.The Welsh Backbencher was praised for his bravery last week after he revealed he is trans in a highly personal statement on Twitter. Following theTory U-turn on the conversion therapy ban, he said it is ‘wrong to exclude protections for a whole group of people’ from an ‘abhorrent’ practice.‘I hope the announcement that a separate piece of work will now be done on this issue will be done at speed,’ Mr Wallis added.‘If the CT (conversion therapy) ban passes through Parliament without any protections for the transgender community, it cannot be described as anything other than a broken promise.’His comments come as more than 100 charities, including Stonewall, plan to boycott the government’s first global LGBT+ conference over its stance on conversion therapy.It is now unclear if the ‘Safe To Be Me: Global Equality Conference’ in London will go ahead after the LGBT+ and HIV charities, along with major sponsors, pulled out just three months before the event.A government spokesperson said it was ‘disappointing’ to see partners quit the conference, which was set to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the first ever London Pride march.They added officials are still ‘considering how to proceed’.In a statement on Twitter yesterday, Stonewall said it will only participate if the prime minister reverts to his promise for a trans-inclusive ban on conversion therapy.‘This is a decision we take with a heavy heart,’ it said.
metro.co.uk
The UK’s first national LGBTQ museum will open in 2022
LGBTQ+ museum is due to open in London in spring 2022.The museum, created by the charity Queer Britain, will be located in Kings Cross in north London, in part of a building owned by Art Fund, the national charity for art.It will be a ‘fully inclusive space that celebrates the stories, people and places that are so intrinsic to the queer community in the UK’, the charity declared.Queer Britain, established in 2018, plans for the museum to allow visitors to explore and learn about the past, present and future stories of the LGBTQ+ community.The director and co-founder of Queer Britain, Joseph Galliano, said: ‘It’s time the UK had an LGBTQ+ museum for all, and we are delighted to have found our first home in beautiful Granary Square, with Art Fund as our first landlord.‘It’s a prime location accessible to swathes of the country, and in a part of town with a rich queer heritage.’The new museum will include four galleries, a workshop, an education space, a gift shop, and offices for the Queer Britain team.The space will be fully accessible with lifts and ramps and will be free to enter, with donations welcome to support its work.Queer Britain’s archive is currently housed at the Bishopsgate Institute and is accessible by appointment to the public and researchers.A trustee of Queer Britain, Lisa Power, shared: ‘I’m really excited that Queer Britain is finally going to have a space to show what we can do and that we’re here for all the community, from old lesbian feminist warhorses like me to young queer folk of all genders and ethnicities.‘Queer Britain aims to tell our many and diverse histories, and now we have a home to do that from.’The director of Art Fund, Jenny Waldman, said the charity was ‘delighted’ to welcome Queer
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