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The First Gay Film: Different From the Others From 1919

The first known film with a gay love story was made more than 100 years ago.Greatly predating Brokeback Mountain, Making Love, and all the rest, the 1919 German film Different From the Others tells the story of two men who fall in love, one a prominent musician and the other his protégé, and are threatened by a blackmailer. The film argues for the acceptance of homosexuality.The Outfest UCLA Legacy Project restored the film to the extent possible a few years ago. The Legacy Project is a partnership between Outfest, Los Angeles’s LGBTQ+ film festival, and the University of California, Los Angeles, Film and Television Archive.
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